Théâtre de la Mode

Inspired by the original Théâtre de la Mode The House of Embroidered Paper has begun to create miniature works, presented on small mannequins as part of its collections.

"After Paris was liberated, the idea for a miniature theatre of fashion came from Robert Ricci, son of couturier Nina Ricci. All materials were in short supply at the end of World War II, and Ricci proposed using miniature mannequins, or fashion dolls, to address the need to conserve textiles, leather, fur...Some 60 Paris couturiers...Nina Ricci, Balenciaga, Germaine Lecomte, Mad Carpentier, Martial & Armans, Hermès, Phillipe & Gaston, Madeleine Vramant, Jeanne Lanvin, Marie-Louise Bruyère, Pierre Balmain...joined and volunteered their scrap materials and labour to create miniature clothes in new styles for the exhibit. Milliners created miniature hats, hairstylists gave the mannequins individual coiffures, and jewellers such as Van Cleef and Arpels and Cartier contributed small necklaces and accessories. Some seamstresses even crafted miniature undergarments to go under the couture designs. Seamstresses carried their sewing machines around with them to complete work on the Théâtre de la Mode during Paris's post-War electricity shortages..."

- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Th%C3%A9%C3%A2tre_de_la_Mode

The first of my contributions to this tradition was inspired by Wendy Duggan, a contributor to the Talking Wardrobe project, where contributors are interviewed about the links they have to specific garments and what they share becomes inspiration for the creation of a unique work by The House of Embroidered Paper.

 

To read Wendy's story please click here

miniature mannequin

Photography by Ray Sullivan

miniature mannequin
miniature mannequin